What a Thing to Say To The Queen Book Review

Happy New Year, Royal Posters! I hope you’ve enjoyed a happy holiday season. It’s hard to believe that we started this blog in 2011 so are already into our 6th year.

To kick off this New Year on The Royal Post, I’d like to share some snippets from a delightful book on the British Royals. Just published in November of 2015, it’s called What a Thing To Say to The Queen: A Collection of Royal Anecdotes from the House of Windsor by Thomas Blaikie. Lucky me – I was given a copy for Christmas.

Perfect to read with a cup of tea (source)
Perfect to read with a cup of tea (source)

Mr. Blaikie has compiled a fun collection of witty quips and (very) short stories, many never published, that give insight into the goings on of the Royal Family.   It’s not too saccharine and is the perfect book to pick up and read snippets of here and there. It also has accompanying illustrations that give it some extra flavor.

Here are a few of my favorites to give you a taste.

In a chapter titled “No Airs and Graces’:

At Highclere, better knows as Downton Abbey, a farm worker was wedged under a broken-down trailer when he heard a familiar voice asking, “Can I help?’ It was the Queen, in a headscarf, out walking with a dog. She is on of those guests who wants to make a contribution.

The Queen at a polo match at Highclere Castle aka Downton Abbey (source)
The Queen at a polo match at Highclere Castle aka Downton Abbey (source)

The Queen had an adventure getting to a private party in London recently. ‘We were coming across the Park’, she told friends, ‘when a policemen stepped in front of the car and made us wait while a big procession of vehicles passed by with blue flashing lights. It must have been a very important ruler.’

In the Chapter titled Staff:

While Prince Charles and Lady Diana were announcing their engagement to the world’s press on the lawn of Buckingham Palace on 24 February 1981, two people were twitching their curtains, hoping not to be seen, in the windows behind them: the Prince’s valet and the Queen.

Charles & Diana on the grounds of Buckingham Palace (Source). Photo by Tim Graham/Getty Images
Charles & Diana on the grounds of Buckingham Palace (Source). Photo by Tim Graham/Getty Images

The Queen granted fifteen sittings to the artist Lucian Freud between May 2000 and December 200, not in the usual grand palace drawing room but in an art restoration studios in St. James’s Palace. He wanted the Queen in the royal diadem but with a blue day suit, not the usual state dress. The finished portrait was disliked by many who were unfamiliar with the artist’s approach. Because of the value of the diadem, protection officers had to be present, but Freud found them distracting and the Queen asked them to go outside. One of the men, the Queen said, she knew quite well. While picking up birds at a shoot on a friend’s estate, a cock pheasant had hurtled out of a hedge and knocked her over. There was blood. The officer rushed up and, hurling himself upon her, began administering the kiss of life. He thought she had been shot. The Queen was impressed and engaged him in her own protection squad. 

Lucian Freud portrait of Queen Elizabeth II (source; The Royal Collection)
Lucian Freud portrait of Queen Elizabeth II (source: The Royal Collection)

In the Chapter titled Our Eye for Details:

The Queen annotated the program for a state visit of the King and Queen go Thailand in the 1960’s. ‘Tell the band leader under no circumstances to play excerpts from the King and I.’

HM Queen Elizabeth II with HM King Bhumibol Adulyadej of Thailand in 1960 (source)
HM Queen Elizabeth II with HM King Bhumibol Adulyadej of Thailand in 1960 (source)

In the Chapter titled Mother:

The Queen Mother wished to name her second daughter Anne, but George VI wouldn’t have it. She had to settle for Margaret, the King’s preference, which she considered a maid’s name. Curious that when her time came, the present Queen called her first daughter Anne. 

Margaret, Elizabeth, & Anne (source)
Margaret, Elizabeth, & Anne (source)

In a chapter titled Wild Side:

The Queen was greatly excited about Ginny Airlie’s  70th birthday party at Annabel’s in February 2003. She hadn’t been to a nightclub, she said, since she was first married. On an engagement the following day at St. Alban’s Abbey in Hertfordshire, the Dean asked her if she knew Robert Salisbury, also present. ‘Oh yes’, she said, ‘Robert and I were in a nightclub last night until half past one.’ 

There are plenty more anecdotes in the book and I highly recommend picking up a copy!

All best wishes for a happy 2016.

 

 

2 Replies to “What a Thing to Say To The Queen Book Review”

  1. I preordered this book before it came out. I was probably one of the first people in the U.S. to get it. It’s delightful. I can’t recommend it enough.

  2. Thank you for pointing this out. Just ordered my copy from Amazon. Am sure it won’t disappoint! Happy New Year! Love your blog! Marilyn Roccoforte

    Sent from my iPad

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